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Projects in 1990–1991


Hughes Aircraft Company: Resource Allocation Model

Advisor
Janet Myhre
College
CMC

Unavailable

Hughes Simulations Systems: Automated Database Generation

Advisor
Stavros Busenberg

Photobased visual systems require a large expenditure of time and resources to generate the databases upon which they operate. The Clinic analyzed the feasibility of using sequential imagery, that is, video or time lapse photography, to automate the process. The Clinic extended the existing mathematical techniques of photogrammetry to time and space separated pairs, and developed methods for generating and optomizing the accuracy of the databases.

Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Software Metric Data Analysis

Advisor
Janet Myhre
College
CGU

JPL has developed several metrics during software development for several projects. Limited data about different projects are currently available for statistical analysis. The Clinic intends to perform statistical analysis on the given data and extract useful information for metrics development and analysis.

Lockheed: Fault Tree Analysis

Advisor
Janet Myhre
College
CMC

Unavailable

McDonnell Douglas: Low Altitude Proton Currents Due To Solar Cycles

Advisor
Wing Tam

Theoretical models already exist for solar cycle behavior of the trapped proton current at low altitudes. Data has been obtained from NOAA satellites in appropriate energy bands for a complete solar cycle. No one has yet made a comparison of this data with the existing theory. This project examined the data, obtained instrument characteristics, and made comparisons with the existing theory. The aim was to validate the theory, and modify it so that the results could be applied to formulating specifications for the space station Freedom.

Rand Corporation: Chaos In Combat Model

Advisor
Mario Martelli

Computer models are widely used by the U.S. armed forces in order to simulate and predict the outcome of combat situations. Even very simple forms of such models have been shown to have parameter regions where they exhibit great sensitivity to initial data variations and where chaotic behavior may occur. This project extended the work of previous year Clinic on such models and developed a solid mathematical basis for analyzing chaotic behavior in piecewise continuous combat models. Both analysis and simulations were used to explain the connection between chaotic behavior and highly non-monotone parameter dependence in these combat models.

Teledyne Microelectronics: Statistical Process Control In Microelectronics

Advisor
Henry Krieger

In the machine bonding of wire to semiconductors there are several measurable parameters (the “secondary parameters”) which are used to evaluate the overall quality of the process, and there is another set of machine specific parameters (the “primary parameters”) which can be set in order to control the bonding process. In this project a sensitivity analysis is performed on the main wire bonding secondary parameters in order to determine their interaction with the primary parameters controlling the performance of this process.

The project centered around the study of the effects of variations in each secondary parameter, and in the interaction between the secondary and the primary control parameters. Moreover, the secondary parameters were grouped using different permutations and the interaction of simultaneous variations in such groupings with the primary parameters were studied. The aim was to develop a control envelope which described the processes' preset tolerance limits, and which could form the basis for a computer control system of the wire bonding machine.

USC Information Sciences Institute: Heat Transfer From A VLSI Chip

Advisor
Ellis Cumberbatch
College
CGU

Heat is generated in the densely-packed circuits in a chip and must be conducted away if large temperatures are to be avoided. We model a chip as a thin heat-producing region connected to the exterior by many thin aluminum wires, the whole sandwiched between silicon layers. Using a variety of analytical and numerical techniques we have found the proportions of heat conducted through the silicon layers end through the wires.